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Work Skills Level 1 Sample Assignment Of Inheritance

Work Relationships: Explained

A work relationship is a relationship between a person and a legal employer. It provides the context in which a person's assignments exist and enterprise and legal employer service is calculated. All work relationships must contain at least one assignment. You create and manage work relationships for a person in the Person Management work area.

Aspects of work relationships explained here include:

  • Work relationship types

  • Work relationships for nonworkers

  • Primary and nonprimary work relationships

  • Terminating the primary work relationship

  • Creating multiple work relationships for a person

  • Worker types

  • Worker numbers

Work Relationship Types

Work relationships are of three types:

  • Employee

  • Contingent worker

  • Nonworker

The worker type that you select when creating the work relationship determines the relationship type.

Work Relationships for Nonworkers

To be classified as a nonworker, a person must have a nonworker work relationship with a legal employer. Having a work relationship doesn't mean that a person is working for a legal employer. It means only that there's an association between the person and the legal employer that's defined by the work relationship and assignment.

Primary and Nonprimary Work Relationships

A worker or nonworker must have one, and only one, primary work relationship. All other work relationships are nonprimary. A person's first work relationship is the primary relationship, by default.

A person's overall primary assignment belongs to the person's primary work relationship. Regardless of how many work relationships and assignments a person has, you may need information about a person from a single assignment. For example, some government reports are based on one assignment only. In these cases, the person's primary assignment is used. In general, a person's primary work relationship and assignment are those that are of most significance, in terms of status, pay, benefits, and working hours, to the person.

Terminating the Primary Work Relationship

You terminate work relationships, not workers or nonworkers.

When a person has multiple current work relationships, you can't terminate the primary work relationship without first selecting a different primary relationship. This restriction exists because a current worker or nonworker can't be without a primary work relationship for any period of time.

Related Topics

Assignments: Explained

An assignment is a set of information about a person's role in a legal employer. It includes the person's job, position, pay, compensation, managers, working hours, and location. You manage assignments using the Manage Employment task in the Person Management work area.

This topic describes the following aspects of assignments:

  • Assignments and work relationships

  • Primary assignments

  • Assignment numbers

  • Assignment names

  • Assignment statuses

  • Contracts and collective agreements

  • Inheritance of values in assignments

Assignments and Work Relationships

All work relationships, regardless of type, have at least one assignment. Your legal employer may allow multiple assignments in a single work relationship. Within a single work relationship, all assignments are of the same type. For example, in a nonworker work relationship, only nonworker assignments are possible.

Primary Assignments

When you need information about a person from a single assignment, the person's overall primary assignment supplies it. For example, some government reports are based on one assignment only.

You must identify one assignment as the primary assignment in each work relationship. When a person has multiple work relationships, the overall primary assignment is the primary assignment in the primary work relationship.

In this example, assignment C is the overall primary assignment because it is the primary assignment in the primary work relationship.

Assignment Numbers

Assignments are identified by assignment numbers, which you can allocate either manually or automatically. If you allocate numbers manually, they must be unique in the enterprise.

The application creates numbers for automatic allocation by prefixing the person number with the character E (for employee), C (for contingent worker), or N (for nonworker). A person's second and subsequent assignments of the same type have a suffix number. For example:

  1. E45678

  2. E45678-2

  3. E45678-3

The person number in this example is 45678. The suffix-number sequence is global and ensures that assignment numbers are unique in the enterprise. If the same person also has assignments of other types, the number sequence for those assignments starts from 1. For example:

  1. N45678

  2. N45678-2

Assignment Names

Assignments have names, which provide an easily understood method of identifying assignments. By default, assignment names don't appear in the assignment, but your enterprise or legal employer can make them visible.

The assignment name is the job name. A suffix number identifies a person's second and subsequent assignments when the jobs are the same. For example:

  1. Sales Director

  2. Sales Director-2

If the assignment doesn't contain a job name, the assignment number copies automatically to the assignment name. You can edit assignment names.

Assignment Statuses

The assignment status value determines whether the assignment is active, inactive, or temporarily suspended. It also controls whether the assignment is eligible for payroll processing.

When you create or edit an assignment, you select an action to categorize the change for reporting and analysis purposes. Some actions make an automatic change to the assignment status. For example, when you create an assignment, its status is set automatically to Active - payroll eligible. Otherwise, you must set the assignment status directly.

Contracts and Collective Agreements

Assignments can include contract details, which some legal employers require. The contract details are for information only; they have no effect on processing. You can extend the period of a contract included in the assignment using the Contract Extension action. This action is available for selection only when you update the assignment and enter an effective date that is later than the current projected end date of the contract. You can either specify an extension period or update the current projected end date of the contract. You can view the history of extensions made to a contract in the contract details.

You can link a collective agreement to an assignment provided the bargaining unit, country, and legal employer of the collective agreement are consistent with the assignment. If a collective agreement was created without associating it with a legal employer or bargaining unit, you can link the collective agreement to any assignment within the same country. However, if a collective agreement was created by associating it only with a legal employer, you can link the collective agreement to any assignment for the legal employer.

Inheritance of Values in Assignments

If you use employment terms, assignments automatically inherit from the employment terms any values specified there. Your enterprise determines whether you can update inherited values in the associated assignments.

If you use position synchronization, assignments automatically inherit attribute values specified in the position. Your enterprise or legal employer configuration determines which attributes are synchronized from the position and whether you can update inherited values in the associated assignments.

If you use position synchronization, then position synchronization takes precedence over inheritance of attribute values from employment terms.

Related Topics

Inheritance of Assignment Values from Employment Terms: Explained

Most assignment attributes occur also in employment terms. When you specify values for those attributes in employment terms, any associated assignments inherit those values automatically. Inherited values are therefore the same in all assignments. You can enter other values (those not entered in employment terms) directly in each assignment; therefore, those values can be different in each assignment. You manage assignment attributes using the Manage Employment task in the Person Management work area.

This topic describes:

  • Specifying assignment values in employment terms

  • Editing inherited values on assignments

  • Editing employment terms

Assignment Values in Employment Terms

Consider the attribute values of assignments A, B, and C. The job and assignment category values are the same in all assignments because they are inherited from the employment terms. The location, working as a manager, and person type values can be different in each assignment because they aren't inherited from the employment terms in this example.

Job

Sales Manager

Sales Manager

Sales Manager

Sales Manager

Location

 

Building 1

Building 2

Building 3

Working as a Manager

 

Yes

No

No

Person Type

 

Area Manager

Area Deputy Manager

Training Manager

Assignment Category

Full-Time

Full-Time

Full-Time

Full-Time

You always enter values for the work measures, managers, and extra information attributes individually in each assignment, even if they have been enabled in employment terms at your enterprise or legal employer. Values for these attributes are never inherited by the associated assignments.

Inherited Values on Assignments

If your legal employer allows override at the assignment level, you can edit on an assignment any of the values that it inherits from employment terms. Some enterprises let you decide, for each set of employment terms that you create, whether override at the assignment level is allowed for those employment terms.

You can edit the following values on the assignment regardless of whether override at the assignment level is allowed:

  • Assignment name

  • Assignment number

  • Assignment status

  • Assignment projected end date

About Editing Employment Terms

If you edit a value in employment terms when override at the assignment level is allowed, each associated assignment inherits the changed value from the employment terms only if the two values were the same before the change. If the two values were different before the change, the assignment doesn't inherit the changed value from the employment terms, as shown in the following example.

Job

Sales Manager

Sales Team Leader

Sales Vice President

Sales Team Leader

Location

Northern Office

Northern Office

Headquarters

Headquarters

If override at the assignment level is not allowed, you edit the employment terms instead and all associated assignments automatically inherit the changed values. Preventing override at the assignment level affects only those values that you specify on the employment terms. If you leave a value blank on the employment terms, you can edit it at any time on the associated assignments.

Using Employment Terms for Nonworkers: Examples

A nonworker must have at least one assignment. If you enable employment terms for the legal employer, then nonworkers also have at least one set of employment terms in a nonworker work relationship. This topic describes some ways in which you can use employment terms for nonworkers. You manage employment terms using the Manage Employment task in the Person Management work area.

Multiple Nonworker Assignments in a Single Work Relationship

A nonworker has multiple assignments of the same type (for example, multiple assignments as a volunteer) where the assignment details are largely the same. For efficiency reasons, all of the assignments belong to a single set of employment terms: the assignments inherit values entered in the employment terms automatically, which makes assignments quicker to create and manage. You make any changes, such as increasing the working hours, to the employment terms, and all assignments inherit the changes automatically.

Limiting Changes to a Nonworker's Assignments

A nonworker has multiple assignments, each of which has a different line manager. You want to ensure that some values are the same in all assignments; therefore, you create the assignments in a single set of employment terms. Doing so prevents override at the assignment level. You must make changes to the assignments, such as an increase in the working hours, at the employment-terms level. Line managers cannot edit these values on employment terms or on individual assignments.

Worker Numbers: Explained

Worker numbers identify employee and contingent workerwork relationships; therefore, any person with more than one such relationship may have multiple worker numbers.

This topic includes:

  • Enabling worker numbers

  • Allocating worker numbers

  • Retaining worker numbers after termination

Enabling Worker Numbers

The decision to use worker numbers can be made at the enterprise and legal employer levels, using the Manage Enterprise HCM Information and Manage Legal Entity HCM Information tasks. If worker numbers are enabled, then they are required; otherwise, you can't use worker numbers and they are excluded automatically from the application.

Allocating Worker Numbers

You can allocate worker numbers::

  • Manually

  • Automatically from a global sequence

  • Automatically from a legal-employer sequence

Each legal employer selects the number-allocation method for its work relationships. If you use a legal-employer sequence, worker numbers may not be unique in the enterprise. You can't change an automatically allocated worker number.

Retaining Worker Numbers After Termination

When a worker who has previously had a worker number anywhere in the enterprise starts a new employee or contingent worker work relationship, the existing worker number is reused, unless the new work relationship:

  • Is of a different type from the previous work relationship. For example, the new work relationship is an employee work relationship and the previous work relationship was a contingent worker work relationship.

  • Is of the same type as the previous work relationship. However, the new work relationship is with a different legal employer, and a legal-employer number sequence was used in the previous work relationship.

In these two cases, a new worker number is allocated.

Seniority Dates: Explained

A seniority date is a date on which the calculation of a person's length of service with the enterprise or a legal employer is based. In most cases, seniority dates are the same as start or hire dates; however, using separate seniority dates you can manage them independently of start or hire dates. You manage hire and seniority dates using the Create Work Relationship and Manage Work Relationship tasks in the Person Management work area.

This topic describes legal-employer and enterprise seniority dates.

Legal-Employer Seniority Dates

A person can have three work relationships simultaneously with a single legal employer:

  • Employee

  • Contingent worker

  • Nonworker

Legal employer seniority dates are maintained for all three types of work relationships; therefore, a person can have up to three legal employer seniority dates for a single legal employer.

If you leave the legal-employer seniority date in a work relationship blank, it's assumed to be the same as the start or hire date of the work relationship.

You can adjust legal-employer seniority dates for any reason. For example, if a person takes an absence of one month that can't be included in service calculations, you can adjust the dates of the person's work relationship as shown in this table.

Employee

1 March, 2010

1 April, 2010

This adjustment has the effect of reducing the person's employee legal-employer service by one month, which may affect the person's entitlement to service-related benefits.

When a person has multiple sequential relationships of the same type with a single legal employer, you can adjust the legal employer seniority date of the latest work relationship manually to include the previous service.

Enterprise Seniority Date

A person has a single enterprise seniority date, which is the date on which calculation of a person's enterprise service is based. The enterprise seniority date is the start date of a person's primary work relationship by default. You can update a person's enterprise seniority date only when you create or edit the person's primary work relationship.

You can adjust the enterprise seniority date for any reason; for example, you may want to adjust the date to include previous service. Consider the following employee work relationships, where a break exists between the end of the first work relationship and the start of the second.

Employee

A

5 January, 2004

5 January, 2004

31 December, 2004

Employee

B

1 May, 2005

5 May, 2004

 

In this example, the person's enterprise seniority date, until the start of the work relationship with legal employer B, is 5 January, 2004. When you create the second work relationship, you can enter a new enterprise seniority date that takes account of the person's previous employee service. To calculate the person's new enterprise seniority date, you would add 120 days (the period from 1 January, 2005, to 30 April, 2005, when this person was not employed) to the previous enterprise seniority date, 5 January, 2004, to give a revised enterprise seniority date of 5 May, 2004. If you didn't enter the new date, the enterprise seniority date is 1 May, 2005.

Note

If you select a different primary work relationship for a person, the existing enterprise seniority date copies automatically to the new primary work relationship and removed from the previous primary work relationship.

Related Topics

Managing Seniority Dates: Explained

You can view and manage the seniority dates of persons using the Manage Seniority Dates task in the Person Management work area.

In the Manage Seniority Dates page, the seniority dates are organized in a hierarchy that shows all the work relationships and assignments for a person. You can view the length of service for each seniority date and override the seniority date if the seniority date rule is configured to allow edits.

You can view the seniority dates at the person, work relationship, and assignment levels.

Seniority Dates - Person Level

All the work relationships and assignments for the person are considered while deriving the seniority date at the person level.

Enterprise Seniority Date - Person Level: This seniority date represents the joining date of the person with the enterprise. The date is populated for a hire and does not change for a rehire. As the date is defined at the person level, it does not change even if multiple work relationships are created for the person.

Legal Employer Seniority Date - Person Level: This seniority date represents the joining date of the person with the legal employer. The date is populated for a hire and does not change for a rehire. As the date is defined at the person level, it does not change even if multiple work relationships are created for the person.

Seniority Dates - Work Relationship Level

All the assignments under the work relationship are considered while deriving the seniority date at the work relationship level.

Legal Employer Seniority Date - Work Relationship Level: This seniority date represents the joining date of the person with the legal employer for a work relationship. The date is populated for a hire and a new seniority date is created for a rehire because a new work relationship is created. Similarly, as the date is defined at the work relationship level, for each work relationship addition, a new record is populated. Also, because the date is defined at the work relationship level, the scope of this seniority date is the current work relationship.

Seniority Dates - Assignment Level

All the date effective records of the assignment are considered while deriving the seniority date at the assignment level.

Bargaining Unit Seniority Date - Assignment Level: This seniority date represents the joining date of the person with a bargaining unit for an assignment. The date is populated for a hire if the bargaining unit is selected. When the bargaining unit is changed, a new seniority record is populated for the bargaining unit with the joining date of the earlier bargaining unit.

Related Topics

Seniority and Service Dates: Examples

This topic illustrates the default behavior of seniority and service dates for a single worker, Mike Caruso.He has multiple work relationships of all types with multiple legal employers in the enterprise. You manage hire and seniority dates using the Create Work Relationship and Manage Work Relationship tasks in the Person Management work area.

Work Relationship 1 (Employee)

Mike's first and primary work relationship with the enterprise is an employee work relationship with legal employer A. His hire date is 21 March, 2011.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

21 March, 2011

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

21 March, 2011

Start date of Mike's first employee work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 21 March, 2011 (the start date the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 21 March, 2011 (the start date of Mike's primary work relationship).

Work Relationship 2 (Contingent Worker)

Mike starts a contingent worker work relationship, also with legal employer A, on 29 June, 2011. Mike now has two current work relationships with legal employer A.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

29 June, 2011

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

29 June, 2011

Start date of Mike's first contingent worker work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 29 June, 2011 (the start date of the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can't be entered or viewed.

The date from work relationship 1 (the primary work relationship) applies. You can change the dateby updating that work relationship.

Work Relationship 3 (Employee)

Mike starts a second employee work relationship, this time with legal employer B, on 10 July, 2011. This relationship becomes the primary work relationship, and Mike now has three current work relationships.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

10 July, 2011

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

21 March, 2011

Start date of Mike's first employee work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 10 July, 2011 (the start date of the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can't be entered or viewed while creating the work relationship.

Once you save this work relationship, the date from work relationship 1 (the previous primary work relationship) copies to this work relationship and removed from work relationship 1. You can change the date by updating this work relationship.

Mike leaves the enterprise on 30 September, 2011, and all three work relationships are terminated.

Work Relationship 4 (Employee)

After a break in service, Mike starts an employee work relationship with legal employer B on 1 January, 2012. This work relationship is Mike's primary work relationship.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

1 January, 2012

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

21 March, 2011

Start date of Mike's first employee work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 1 January, 2012 (the start date of the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, the legal employer start date (1 January, 2012) applies. You can enter a new date to take account of previous service.

Work Relationship 5 (Nonworker)

Mike starts a nonworker work relationship with legal employer A on 20 February, 2012. Mike now has two current work relationships.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

20 February, 2012

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

20 February, 2012

Start date of Mike's first nonworker work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 20 February, 2012 (the start date of the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can't be entered or viewed.

The date from the primary work relationship, work relationship 4 (1 January, 2012, by default) applies.

Work Relationship 6 (Contingent Worker)

Mike starts a contingent worker work relationship with legal employer B on 31 May, 2012. Mike now has three current work relationships.

The following table shows a summary of Mike's default seniority and service dates for this work relationship.

Legal Employer Start Date

31 May, 2012

Start date of the work relationship.

Enterprise Start Date

29 June, 2011

Start date of Mike's first contingent worker work relationship in the enterprise.

Legal Employer Seniority Date

Blank. Can be entered.

If left blank, is 31 May, 2012 (the start date of the work relationship).

Enterprise Seniority Date

Blank. Can't be entered or viewed.

The date from the primary work relationship, work relationship 4 (1 January, 2012, by default) applies.

On 31 May, 2012, Mike's default seniority and service dates for all work relationships are as shown in the following table.

[NOISE] >> Okay,

here's another concept challenge for you, all about constructors,

what happens when we call the constructor of the Student class?

We've got our familiar classes, here.

We've got our Person class, and we've got our Student class.

And the constructors, check them out, they're a little bit different.

We've got a one argument constructor for the Person class.

A no argument constructor for the Student class.

And then this additional method here in the Person class,

which is setName, which will set the name field inside the Person class.

So, we're gonna ask you to reason about what happens

when you call the Student constructor.

And, this is a concept challenge, so

we want you to do the same procedure that you're used to, just take that video quiz,

first by yourself, then find some people to chat about this question with,

and then watch our learner video, and come back and watch our explanation.

>> Okay, so what did you guys put?

>> I think it's a compiled time error, because Student doesn't have a name.

So how can you set a name it doesn't have?

>> Yeah, but I thought that since Student extends Person,

it actually inherits the name from Person.

>> Oh. >> So then, I actually put Student,

because I thought that now it goes into the constructive for

Person and sets the name to Student.

>> Yeah, I also thought the same.

One thing I did notice was that Student

calls Person, no argument constructor.

And I noticed that there was no argument constructed in Person,

so I think that's the reason why it causes the compile error.

>> Yeah, okay, so yeah, it's probably a compiled time error, then.

>> Yeah. >> All right,

now that you've worked through this yourself, let's work through it together.

All we're doing here is we're calling the Student default constructor.

So let's trace the code and see what happens.

So we go over here to the Student default constructor, and

you might be tempted to just directly go and execute this line that says

this.setName to the string Student, but the problem with that is, you'd

be forgetting that the compiler actually inserts some code into this constructor.

If the first line of the constructor is not either a call to the superclass

constructor or

a call to a constructor within the class, the compiler is going to insert a line

to the superclass constructor that takes no arguments for us.

So, in order to trace through this code, we need to insert that line so

we know exactly what's happening.

So let's do that now.

So if you choose compile error, you'd be correct.

And the reason we're going through this example is,

it turns out it happens a lot that you have a situation like this.

I have it happen to me all the time and

the compile error that you're gonna get is very, very cryptic.

You're gonna read it and be like, what are you talking about,

there is no constructor with no arguments?

I didn't try to call a constructor with no arguments.

Well, you didn't.

But, Java did, and that's what's happening.

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