• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Jl Moreno Bibliography Sample

B MS c66

Moreno, J. L. (Jacob Levy), 1889-1974. Papers, 1906, 1911-1977: Finding Aid

Center for the History of Medicine (Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine)


Center for the History of Medicine (Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine)

© President and Fellows of Harvard College


The organization of the J.L. Moreno Collection was supported in part by the Moreno Fund of the American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama. Boston, 1989.

Descriptive Summary

Call No.: B MS c66
Repository: Center for the History of Medicine (Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine)
Creator: Moreno, J. L. (Jacob Levy), 1889-1974.
Title: Jacob L. Moreno papers,
Date(s): 1906, 1911-1977 (inclusive).
Quantity: 158 boxes
Language of materials: The bulk of the records are in English. A small amount of material is in German.
Abstract: Contains correspondence, patient records, financial and other related material from Beacon Hill (Moreno) Sanitarium, Moreno Research and Training Institutes, and several sociometric and psychodramatic professional societies and international associations and congresses. Also includes correspondence and manuscripts of journal articles edited by Moreno for Beacon Publishing House (which published most of his books) and for the three major journals he founded: Sociometry, Sociatry/Group Psychotherapy, and International Journal of Sociometry. There are also manuscripts and revisions, reprints, and correspondence relating to books authored by Moreno, and others he edited on psychotherapy and sociometry. Other papers include personal correspondence, audio-tapes of sessions and workshops, clippings and scrapbooks, sociometric charts, certificates, and printed material.

Processing Information:

Processed by Jennifer Pelose and SPI , August 2007.

This finding aid has been posted as a product of converting a heritage finding aid to an electronic format for the purpose of facilitating collection access. Researchers should be aware that this finding aid has not been revised to meet current Center for the History of Medicine descriptive practices, nor nationally promulgated content standards. Please report any difficulties using this guide to Public Services.

Conditions Governing Access:

Access to personal and patient information is restricted for 80 years from the date of creation. These restrictions appear in Series I, Subseries B. Researchers may apply for access to restricted records. Consult Public Services for further information.

The Papers are stored offsite. Researchers are advised to contact Public Services for more information concerning retrieval of material.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Boston Medical Library does not hold copyright on all the materials in the collection. Requests for permission to publish material from the collection should be directed to Public Services. Researchers who obtain permission to publish from Public Services are responsible for identifying and contacting the persons or organizations that hold copyright.

Preferred Citation:

Jacob L. Moreno papers, 1906, 1911-1977 (inclusive). B MS c66. Harvard Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Boston, Mass.

Biographical Notes

The J.L. Moreno Collection in the Countway Library of Medicine spans most of Dr. Moreno's career, with the bulk of materials covering the last twenty-five years of his life. The papers, which are contained in a total of 2002 manuscript folders, consist largely of correspondence and manuscript materials (including typescripts and handwritten notes); but also to be found here are announcements and programs, registration forms and questionnaires, monographs and reprints, business and financial data, diaries and notebooks, records and documents, transcripts, mailing lists, printed matter, protocols, and patient records.* Added to all of these are more than 35 items and cartons with oversize and bulk materials--scrapbooks and newspaper clippings, tapes and films, personal effects, conference proceedings, journals and books, and archivists' files (the last includes bibliographical materials as well as a list of the books and journals from JLM's library that were donated with the collection).

Materials related to patients are confidential and may have restrictions placed upon their use.

Jacob Levy Moreno, known for his seminal contributions to the fields of psychodrama, group psychotherapy, and sociometry, was born in Rumania and grew up in Austria and Germany. As a young man he developed a marked interest in philosophy and psychology and attended the University of Vienna, where he earned a medical degree in 1917. A practicing psychiatrist trained in the Vienna of Sigmund Freud, Moreno came to believe that "orthodox psychoanalysis only makes a patient feel more self-conscious and lonely." Seeking new opportunities, he immigrated to the United States in 1925 and eventually acquired an estate in Beacon, New York, a community in Dutchess County. There he founded in 1936 the Beacon Hill Sanitarium and the Therapeutic Theatre for Psychodrama and established within a few years training institutes for workers interested in learning the techniques of psychodrama and sociometry. Both the sanitarium and the institutes that he directed later come to bear his name. In 1957, after the Moreno Institute had become accredited to provide postgraduate training, an Academy of Psychodrama and Group Psychotherapy was added to the enterprise.

Dr. Moreno was a prolific writer and editor. He directed the operation of Beacon House, Inc., the firm he established to publish journals and monographs devoted to the subjects of sociometry, group psychotherapy, and psychodrama, and served as its chief editor. In addition, he was an editor of such large-scale works as Progress in Psychotherapy, Vols. I-V (1956-1960), The Sociometry Reader (1961), and The International Handbook of Group Psychotherapy (1966). Among the many articles and monographs that he authored are his books, Who Shall Survive? (1934), Words of the Father (1941), The Theatre of Spontaneity (1947), and Psychodrama, Vols. I–III (1946-1969). He also left behind him a number of unpublished manuscripts, mostly autobiographical in nature.

JLM served as adjunct professor of sociology at New York University in the 1950s and ′60s and was active in such professional organizations as the American Psychiatric Association, the American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry, the American and New York Medical Associations, and the American Sociological Association. He founded and held prominent positions in the American Sociometric Association, the American Society for Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama (ASGPP), and the International Association of Group Psychotherapy. Perhaps his greatest satisfaction came through the international congresses of group psychotherapy, psychodrama, and sociometry over which he presided during the last two decades of his life.

The nucleus of the Moreno Collection came to the Countway Library in 1978 as a gift from Dr. Moreno's widow, Zerka, and his son, Jonathan, and was afterwards supplemented by further materials. A few years later the ASGPP established a fund for processing the archive, and in 1984 the materials finally embarked on their slow but inexorable transition from chaotic, crusty boxes to a marked, ordered, and preserved system. Initially, the collection was processed under the direction of Christopher Kraus, a graduate student at Harvard with an interest in psychodrama. Because he finished his studies and left the Boston area before the project could be put in final form, an archivist already on the staff was assigned to tackle the problems that remained to be solved. These concerned preservation of materials, organizing and describing the collection for ease of use, and preparation of a selected name index accurately keyed to the final box and folder numbers.

The introduction prepared by the previous archivist and his assistant no longer describes the arrangement of materials; but their view of JLM as a larger-than-life figure, as well as their comments on his more provocative pronouncements and on some of the unique materials in the collection, is of interest and appears in the front matter to this inventory. Also here will be found a chronology giving highlights of Moreno's life and work and an outline of how the archive is arranged. Following the inventory itself is an index to most of the correspondents and authors of papers who interacted with Moreno and his areas of interest.

It should be noted that the record of the last quarter century of the life of Jacob Levy Moreno reveals an interwoven professional and personal venture shared by his wife and collaborator, Zerka Toeman Moreno. Since Mrs. Moreno frequently acted or wrote in behalf of her husband, no attempt has been made either to differentiate her files or to include her name in the index, other than in obvious instances or for personal materials. This policy has been extended to others who acted and wrote in behalf of Dr. Moreno and his enterprise (albeit on a lesser scale)--for example, Ann Manzoeillo or any of the other secretaries at Beacon--especially when dealing with routine administrative matters.

Chronology of Jacob L. Moreno

  • 1889
    • Iacov Moreno Levi born on May 18 to Nissim Moreno Levy and Pauline Wolf, Bucharest
  • 1894
  • 1908
    • organizes a "religion of the encounter," Vienna
  • 1908-1912
    • directs impromptu play with children, Stadt Park and The Augarten, Vienna
  • 1910-1912
    • student of philosophy and mathematics, University of Vienna
  • 1911
    • begins Einladung zu einer Begegnung [Invitation to an Encounter], subtitle of a series of psychodrama protocols, speeches and reports, the first of which is Die Gottheit als Komödiant [The Godhead as Actor], Vienna
  • 1913-1914
    • directs group therapy with prostitutes, Am Spittelberg District, Vienna
  • 1917
    • receives M. D. degree from the University of Vienna
  • 1917-1918
    • Superintendent, Mitterndorf resettlement community, near Vienna
  • 1918-1920
    • publishes Daimon, quarterly journal of existential literature (renamed Der Neue Daimon in 1919)
  • 1918-1925
    • public health officer, Voslau, Austria; medical director, Kammgarn Spinnerei, Voslau; engaged in private practice of psychiatry, Voslau and Vienna
  • 1920
    • Das Testament des Vaters [The Words of the Father], authored anonymously, Berlin
  • 1921-1923
    • directs Das Stregreiftheatre, public theatre of spontaneity, Maysedergasse, Vienna
  • 1923
    • Der Konigsroman [The King's Novel] authored anonymously, Potsdam, Berlin
  • 1924
    • Das Stegreiftheatre [The Theatre of Spontaneity] authored anonymously, Berlin
  • 1924
    • patentee of "radio film," for electromagnetic recording of sound on discs for radio transmission and reception
  • 1925
    • completes Einladung zu einer Begegnung series with publication of Die Rede von den Richter [Speech before the Judge], Berlin
  • 1925
    • arrives on Oct 7 in America aboard the S.S. Mauretania
  • 1927
    • becomes licensed to practice medicine in the State of New York
  • 1928
    • conducts psychodramatic work with children, Plymouth Institute, Brooklyn, New York
  • 1928
    • introduces spontaneity test, Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Mental Hygiene Clinic, New York City
  • 1929
    • conducts psychodramatic work, Grosvenor Neighborhood House and Hunter College, New York City
  • 1929
    • founds Moreno Laboratories, New York City
  • 1929-1931
    • director, Impromptu Theatre, Carnegie Hall, New York City
  • 1931
    • founds and edits Impromptu magazine
  • 1931
    • opens public performance of impromptu play and the living newspaper, Theatre Guild
  • 1931
    • conducts sociometric tests, Public School 181, Brooklyn
  • 1931-1932
    • conducts sociometric studies, Sing Sing Prison, New York
  • 1932
    • Conference on Group Methods, American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, Bellevue Stratford Hotel, Philadelphia
  • 1932
    • "Application of the group method to classification," paper by JLM and E. Stagg Whitin (reprinted as The First Book on Group Psychotherapy, Beacon, New York, 1957)
  • 1932
    • directs psychodrama in industry, Macy's Department Store, New York City
  • 1932-1938
    • directs long-term sociometric community research, New York State Training School for Girls, Department of Social Welfare, Hudson
  • 1933
    • displays sociometric charts at annual meeting of the Medical Society of New York, Waldorf Astoria Hotel
  • 1934
    • becomes naturalized citizen of United States; legal name change to Jacob Levy Moreno [in use since 1923]
  • 1934
    • Who Shall Survive? A New Approach to the Problem of Human Interrelations, published in Washington, D.C.
  • 1934
    • advisor to Subsistence Homestead Division, United States Department of Interior
  • 1935
    • founds Sociometric Review
  • 1935
    • founds Therapeutic Motion Pictures, Inc.
  • 1936
    • founder and physician-in-charge, Beacon Hill Sanitarium, Beacon, New York, licensed by New York Department of Mental Hygiene
  • 1936
    • opens Therapeutic Theatre for Psychodrama at Beacon
  • 1937
    • founds and publishes Sociometry, A Journal of Interpersonal Relations
  • 1937-1938
    • visiting professor, New School of Social Research, course titled "Sociometry"
  • 1938
    • opens Psychodramatic Training Institute, Beacon, New York
  • 1938
    • marries Florence Bridge on April 30
  • 1939
    • birth of daughter, Regina, on March 26
  • 1939
    • visiting professor, Teachers College Columbia University, course titled "Introduction to Psychodrama"
  • 1941
    • The Words of the Father, translation of Das Testament des Vaters, published by Beacon Publishing House, Inc., New York
  • 1941
    • inaugurates therapeutic theatre of psychodrama at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Washington, D.C.
  • 1942
    • founds and directs Sociometric Institute and New York Theatre of Psychodrama, a division of the Psychodramatic Institute, both in New York City
  • 1942
    • founder and president, The Society of Psychodrama and Group Psychotherapy, renamed American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama (ASGPP)
  • 1943-1970
    • Sociometry Monographs and Psychodrama Monographs published by Beacon House, Inc., New York
  • 1945
    • American Sociometric Association incorporated
  • 1946
    • fellow, American Psychiatric Association
  • 1946
    • Psychodrama, Volume I, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1947
    • founder, editor, publisher of Journal of Group and Inter-group Therapy, official organ of ASGPP (name changed to Group Psychotherapy: Journal of Sociopsychopathology and Sociatry in 1950; Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama in 1970; and Journal of Group Psychotherapy, Psychodrama and Sociometry in 1976)
  • 1947
    • The Theater of Spontaneity, translation of Das Stegreiftheater, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1947-1948
    • special lecturer, Harvard University
  • 1949
    • dedicates Theatre of Psychodrama at Psychological Clinic, Harvard University
  • 1949
    • Sociometric and Psychodramatic Institutes receive provisional charter for post-graduate training credit from Board of Regents of State of New York
  • 1949
    • psychodrama opens on Broadway, Mansfield Theatre, New York City
  • 1949
    • marries Celine Zerka Toeman on December 8
  • 1951
    • Psychodramatic and Sociometric Institutes, Beacon and New York City, renamed Moreno Institute, Beacon Hill Sanitarium renamed Moreno Sanitarium
  • 1951
    • organizes International Committee of Group Psychotherapy
  • 1951-1966
    • adjunct professor of sociology, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York University
  • 1952
    • birth of son, Jonathan David, on June 11
  • 1953
    • Who Shall Survive? Foundations of Sociometry, Group Psychotherapy and Sociodrama, enlarged edition, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1953
    • consultant for televised psychodrama, WTOP, Washington D.C.
  • 1954
    • First International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, Toronto
  • 1955
    • Preludes to My Autobiography, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1955
    • directs televised psychodrama, Paris
  • 1956
    • transfers Sociometry to American Sociological Society [renamed Social Psychology in 1976]
  • 1956
    • founder and editor of International Journal of Sociometry and Sociatry [renamed Handbook of International Sociometry in 1971]
  • 1956-1960
    • co-edits annual Progress in Psychotherapy, published by Grune & Stratton in New York
  • 1957
    • Second International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, Zurich
  • 1957
    • founder, International Council of Group Psychotherapy, born out of International Committee of Group Psychotherapy
  • 1957
    • founder, Academy of Psychodrama and Group Psychotherapy, for post-graduate training under auspices of Moreno Institute
  • 1959
    • lectures in U.S.S.R. at Academy of Medical Science, Moscow, and at Bechterev and Pavlov Institutes, Leningrad
  • 1959
    • Psychodrama, Volume II: Foundations of Psychotherapy, in collaboration with Zerka T. Moreno, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1960
    • edits, with others, The Sociometry Reader, published by The Free Press of Glencoe, Illinois
  • 1961
    • founder, World Academy of Psychodrama and Group Psycho-therapy, to integrate and accreditate institutes abroad, and to coordinate international congresses
  • 1963
    • Third International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, Milan
  • 1963
    • Stars in film, "Psychodrama of a Marriage," made by the Centre d'Etudes de Radio et Television
  • 1964
    • serves on faculty of Yeshiva University, New York
  • 1964
    • First International Congress of Psychodrama, Paris
  • 1965
    • founder, Moreno Academy, New York
  • 1966
    • edits, with others, The International Handbook of Group Psychotherapy, published by Philosophical Library, New York (proceedings of the Third International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, 1963)
  • 1966
    • Second International Congress of Psychodrama, Barcelona
  • 1967
    • receives citation for fifty years in practice of medicine from Medical Society of the State of New York
  • 1968
    • Fourth International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, Vienna; Third International Congress of Psychodrama and Sociodrama, (Prague) Baden; First International Congress of Sociometry, (Prague) Baden
  • 1968
    • receives honorary degree from University of Barcelona
  • 1969
    • Psychodrama, Volume III: Action Therapy and Principles of Practice, in collaboration with Zerka T. Moreno, published by Beacon House, Inc.
  • 1969
    • Fourth International Congress of Psychodrama and Sociodrama, Buenos Aires receives
  • 1969
    • Golden Doctor Diploma from University of Vienna; commemorative plaque affixed to former home in Voslau, Austria
  • 1970
    • Fifth International Congress of Psychodrama, Sao Paulo
  • 1971
    • Sixth International Congress of Psychodrama, Amsterdam
  • 1972
    • Seventh International Congress of Psychodrama, Tokyo
  • 1973
    • founder, International Association of Group Psychotherapy
  • 1973
    • Fifth International Congress of Group Psychotherapy, Zurich
  • 1974
    • dies on May 14, several weeks after a stroke, at Beacon, New York

Resources on Jacob L. Moreno

  • Moreno, J.L. Psychodrama, Volume I. Beacon, New York: Beacon House, 1946.
  • Moreno, J.L. Who Shall Survive? Foundations of Sociometry, Group Psychotherapy and Sociodrama. Beacon, New York: Beacon House, 1953.
  • Die Gottheit als komödiant [The Godhead as Actor]. Vienna: Anzengruber Verlag, 1911.

Series and Subseries in the Collection

  • I. The Moreno Enterprise Records, 1929-1977, undated
  • ___A. Moreno Institutes, Academy and World Center Administrative Records, 1930s-1977
  • ______ 1. Correspondence and Administrative Records, 1930s-1974
  • ______ 2. Business and Financial Records, 1960-1977
  • ______ 3. Mailing Lists, 1950-1970s, undated
  • ___B. Beacon Sanitarium and Therapeutic Theatres Records, 1929-1960s, undated
  • ______ 1. Indexes and Patient Records and Protocols, 1929-1944
  • ______ 2. Psychodrama of a Marriage Records, 1939, undated
  • ______ 3. Patient Case and Consultation Records, Correspondence, and Protocols, 1930s, 1940s, 1942-1960s, undated
  • II. National Activities Correspondence and Records, 1941-1974
  • ___ A. Individual Correspondence, 1941-1976
  • ___ B. Organizations Correspondence, 1943-1974
  • ___ C. Geographical Correspondence and Records, 1945-1970
  • ___ D. Other Correspondence, 1950s-1972
  • III. International Activities Records, 1950-1975
  • ___ A. Committees and Congresses Records, 1951-1975
  • ___ B. Countries Files, 1950-1974
  • IV. Publishing and Publications Records, 1911-1976, undated
  • ___ A. Beacon House, Inc. Publications Records, 1939-1973
  • ___B. Jacob Levy Moreno as Editor Records, 1955-1966, undated
  • ______ 1. Sociometry and the Science of Man Publication Records, 1955, undated
  • ______ 2. Progress in Psychotherapy, 1955-1975, undated
  • ______3. International Handbook of Group Psychotherapy, 1963-1966, undated
  • _________ a. Correspondence and publications records, 1963-1966, undated
  • _________ b. Manuscript material, undated
  • ___C. Jacob Levy Moreno as Author Records, 1911-1976, undated
  • ______ 1. Articles and Contributions in German Publication Records, 1953-1973, undated
  • ______ 2. Translations and Contributions in German, 1952-1970
  • ______ 3. Words of the Father, 1941-1969, undated
  • ______ 4. Who Shall Survive?, 1934-1976, undated
  • ______ 5. Other Published Books, 1932-1965, undated, 1934-1976, undated
  • ______ 6. Manuscripts and Unpublished Works, 1942-1950, undated
  • ______ 7. Articles, Speeches, and Short Monographs, 1911-1960s, undated
  • ___ D. Articles and Typescripts by Others, undated
  • V. Personal and Biographical Records, 1906, 1927, 1928, 1934, 1941-1976, undated
  • ___ A. Diaries and Notebooks, 1906, 1927, 1957-1958, 1965, 1971-1972
  • ___ B. Personal Correspondence, 1938-1973, undated
  • ___ C. Personal Business and Financial Records, 1941-1973
  • ___ D. New York University Teaching Records, 1952-1966, undated
  • ___ E. Awards, Honors, and Certificates, 1928, 1934, 1946-1975
  • ___ F. Final Illness and Death Records, 1974
  • ___ G. Biographical Records, 1950-1976, undated
  • VI. Zerka Moreno Personal Records, 1942-1976, undated
  • VII. Oversized and Bulk Records, ca. 1925-1977, undated
  • ___ A. Scrapbooks and Newspaper Clippings, Ca. 1925-1968
  • ___ B. Books and Publications Records, undated
  • ___ C. Conference Proceedings and Related Records, undated
  • ___ D. Moreno Institute Records, post-Jacob Levy Moreno, 1974-1977, undated
  • ___ E. Audio and Visual Items, undated
  • ___ F. Archivist's Files, undated

Scope and Content

"I am a prophet with a sense of humor." The "I" is Jacob Levy Moreno, and the passage is located in some unpublished autobiographical sketches in the J.L. Moreno Collection in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard University, Boston. The collection contains segments of daily correspondence and records from the late 1930s to the 1970s regarding Moreno's vast and diverse personal enterprise at Beacon, New York, and New York City. The enterprise included Moreno Sanitarium,Therapeutic Motion Picture Inc., Beacon Publishing House, the Moreno Institute for psychodramatic and sociometric research, training, and public demonstrations, the World Center of Psychodrama and Group Psychotherapy for the sponsoring of numerous international congresses and lecture tours, and the Moreno Consultation Center for psychiatric treatment. The collection also includes personal correspondence, protocols of public and private psychodrama sessions, manuscripts of unpublished material, early German publications, scrapbooks, audio-tapes, films, and impromptu phonograph records. The earliest materials in the collection date back to when Moreno was a teen-age student in Vienna. There is also such paraphernalia as the "Dr.'s" bow ties and his honorary academic hood from the University of Barcelona.

Some of the most interesting items are fragments of handwritten notes scribbled on the backs of programs, folders, and correspondence. Hidden literally between the lines are autobiographical notes on the origins of J.L. Moreno's name, the significance of his Jewish heritage, and his early encounters in Vienna with Freud and a struggling Viennese painter allegedly named Shickelgruber (later known as Adolf Hitler).

The introductory autobiographical quotation evokes the image of a grandiose comedian destined to drift into anonymity. The first published psychodramatic protocol in J.L. Moreno's anonymously authored series of "Invitations to an Encounter" (Einladung zu einer begegnung) introduces this image the title, "The Godhead as Actor" or Die Gottheit als komödiant in German (1911). Fusing the roles of actor, comedian, and divinely inspired prophet, Moreno set out and subsequently claimed to have founded a science of human relations that encompassed the individual, social, and cosmic psyche. Within the rubrics of psychodrama, sociometry, and spontaneity, he respectively relegated Freud, Marx, and Jesus of Nazareth to the archive of primitive prototypes.

The collection presents a portrait that poses several unanswered biographical questions that are central to the theory and practice of psychodrama, sociometry, and group psychotherapy. Who is this komödiant who proclaimed quizzically, "I am God," and who used to "teach the people to play God," (Moreno, 1946, p. 6)? What was the significance of his personal dilemma of anonymity and the "paternity syndrome," (Moreno, 1953, pp. xxxvii-xxxix)? Should he receive universal recognition as the author of group psychotherapy, the encounter movement, and the use of role playing as a method of professional therapy and training?

In sifting through the collection, it sometimes appears as though Moreno as a young man purposely mapped out his life and then meticulously followed each planned path so that his biographers would be struck by the creative continuity of his long, multi-faceted life. Moreno considered himself a genius of though and action, and he intended to be remembered as one. In an unpublished manuscript, Moreno wrote that his autobiography is written on the premise that its author is a genius; it is an effort to make him look like one, and an earnest effort not to prove that he is one, but to believe it.

The collection challenges the objective observer to measure this ingenuity by the foundations, associations, publications, and channels of communication that J.L. Moreno created. The test of his genius lies as much in what he has done as in what he has said.

In another unpublished manuscript about genius, he wrote in characteristically grandiose style, implicating himself: "Genius is the individual who gives in his life or work expression to his collective aspirations of the entire human species, or a substantial part of it. The better he does this, the more he is a genius. There are many dimensions of expression in every culture and many degrees of representation, therefore there are degrees of genius, minor and major geneiusses [sic]. Absolute genius results from absolute universality." J.L. Moreno's theoretical ingenuity and actual productivity present in the collection a remarkable portrait of a private intellectual and a public activist; a thinker and a doer. These are two roles rarely discovered so thoroughly in one person.

The collection at the Countway Library is a testament to J.L. Moreno's relentless commitment to putting the principles of spontaneity and creativity into action. It reveals how Moreno led his own family into his psychodramatic kingdom. The collection contains a significant amount of correspondence with Zerka T. Moreno, his wife and professional colleague. Their son, Jonathan, reared in the psychodramatic household, and later trained as a psychodramatist, is also represented in the collection. The large number of J.L. Moreno's correspondents reveals a sociometric network and a social atom acquaintance volume that criss-cross the globe and extend well beyond 2000 contacts. His books, published in over fifteen languages, represent the intercultural exchange of information that is necessary for a worldwide social theory. The number of films, audio-tapes, and phonograph records indicates his willingness to use any means of communication available to spread his gospel. The patient records and protocols from Beacon Hill and Moreno Sanitarium document the testing of his theories in therapeutic practice. His expansiveness and truly global aspirations are realized and fully recorded in the detailed organizational correspondence of several international congresses of group psychotherapy and psychodrama. Finally, the collection clearly shows how Moreno constructed a self-perpetuating organism by establishing workshops and training opportunities at the Moreno Institute, throughout the United States and the world.

Ironically, the J.L. Moreno Collection unavoidably tempts that habit of human nature Moreno found most ludicrous and dangerous: worship of the finished product, or worse yet, worship of a single, isolated creator. Did Moreno really want to be idolized as a one-time genius and prophet, ultimately judged, either positively or negatively, by his accomplishments? Above all, he sought those who would encounter and analyze a creative process that encompassed even the creator. The preservation of this collection serves as yet another movement in the self-perpetuating creative process which Moreno felt was the fundamental element to happy, healthy and cooperative social interaction. The conserved papers attend the spontaneous breath of new life.

1986

Christopher Kraus

Joni Clouse

Container List

  • Series I. The Moreno Enterprise Records, 1929-1977, undated.
    Date: 1929-1977, undated.
    • A. Moreno Institutes, Academy and World Center Administrative Records, 1930s-1977 .
      Date: 1930s-1977 .
      • 1. Correspondence and Administrative Records, 1930s-1974.
        Date: 1930s-1974.
        • Box 1, Folder 1, 1930s and 1940s slight printed material
          Date: 1930s and 1940s
        • Box 1, Folder 2, 1934 letter; 1941-1945 general correspondence
          Date: 1934
          Date: 1941-1945
        • Box 1, Folder 3, 1947-1949 general correspondence and other materials
          Date: 1947-1949
        • Box 1, Folder 4, 1942 materials re sociometric questionnaires
          Date: 1942
        • Box 1, Folder 5, 1942 business agreement between JLM and Manny Straus to promote...the newly established Sociometric Institute
          Date: 1942
        • Box 1, Folder 6, 1942 architect's drawings for Beacon Hill; also undated packet of photocards
          Date: 1942
        • Box 1, Folder 7, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1942 correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg; also payment statements
          Date: 1942
        • Box 1, Folder 8, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1943 correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg; also payment statements
          Date: 1943
        • Box 1, Folder 9, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1944-1945 correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg and others
          Date: 1944-1945
        • Box 1, Folder 10, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1944-1945 payment statements
          Date: 1944-1945
        • Box 1, Folder 11, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1946 correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg; also payment statements
          Date: 1946
        • Box 1, Folder 12, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1947 correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg; also payment statements
          Date: 1947
        • Box 1, Folder 13Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: correspondence with A. Ralph Steinberg and others
        • Box 1, Folder 14, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1947 memoranda and legal matters
          Date: 1947
        • Box 1, Folder 15, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1949-1951 correspondence with various people
          Date: 1949-1951
        • Box 1, Folder 16, Correspondence and related materials re rental of premises in New York City for Psychodramatic Institute and Theatre, as follows: 1949-1951 payment statements
          Date: 1949-1951
        • Box 1, Folder 17, [ca. 1940s] photographs and miscellaneous materials
          Date: 1940s
        • Box 1, Folder 18, transcript of May 1948 National Conference at Beacon, New York (106 p.)
          Date: May 1948
        • Box 2, Folder 19, Institutes, etc.: typescript of Aug 5, 1950 Conference on Group Psychotherapy, Psychodrama Institute (15 p)
          Date: Aug 5, 1950
        • Box 2, Folder 20, Institutes, etc.: 1950-1951 correspondence re workshops, courses, summer sessions
          Date: 1950-1951
        • Box 2, Folder 21, Institutes, etc.: Jun 1951 report on the Basic Survey of Various Aspects of Dr. Moreno's Developments, by Austin M. Davies
          Date: Jun 1951
        • Box 2, Folder 22, Institutes, etc.: Feb-Apr 1952 correspondence re workshops, courses, summer sessions
          Date: Feb-Apr 1952
        • Box 2, Folder 23, Institutes, etc.: May-Dec 1952 correspondence re workshops, courses, summer sessions
          Date: May-Dec 1952
        • Box 2, Folder 24, Institutes, etc.: 1952 correspondence with Bruce Chapman and contract re television series
          Date: 1952
        • Box 2, Folder 25, Institutes, etc.: 1951 and 1954 correspondence and related materials re malpractice insurance
          Date: 1951 and 1954
        • Box 2, Folder 26, Institutes, etc.: [early 1950s] registrants and workshop participants
          Date: [early 1950s]
        • Box 2, Folder 27, Institutes, etc.: Aug 25 and Aug 29, 1952 form letters re charter of Moreno Institute by Board of Regents of New York State
          Date: Aug 25 and Aug 29, 1952
        • Box 2, Folder 28, Institutes, etc.: Jan 1952-Jun 1953 general correspondence
          Date: Jan 1952-Jun 1953
        • Box 2, Folder 29, Institutes, etc.: Jul-Dec 1953 general correspondence
          Date: Jul-Dec 1953
        • Box 2, Folder 30, Institutes, etc.: 1952-1953 Moreno Institute receipts
          Date: 1952-1953
        • Box 2, Folder 31, Institutes, etc.: Jul 16 and Dec 29, 1953 minutes of meetings of Board of Trustees, Moreno Institute
          Date: Jul 16 and Dec 29, 1953
        • Box 2, Folder 32, Institutes, etc.: 1954 correspondence with William J. Wedemeyer and related materials re Hudson Hills, Inc. income tax return for 1953
          Date: 1954
          Date: 1953
        • Box 2, Folder 33, Institutes, etc.: 1953-1954 correspondence with Eugene Spitz and related materials re rental of New York City premises
          Date: 1953-1954
        • Box 2, Folder 34, Institutes, etc.: 1954 general correspondence
          Date: 1954
        • Box 2, Folder 35, Institutes, etc.: 1954 inquiries re training programs and literature
          Date: 1954
        • Box 2, Folder 36, Institutes, etc.: 1954 correspondence, financial records and related materials re Labor Day workshop
          Date: 1954
        • Box 2, Folder 37, Institutes, etc.: 1954 inquiries from O.F. Peterson and others re Thanksgiving workshop
          Date: 1954
        • Box 2, Folder 38, Institutes, etc.: 1954 student enrollment forms
          Date: 1954
        • Box 3, Folder 39, Institutes, etc.: 1955-1957 general correspondence
          Date: 1955-1957
        • Box 3, Folder 40, Institutes, etc.: 1955-1957 correspondence re workshops and training programs (incls enrollment forms)
          Date: 1955-1957
        • Box 3, Folder 41, Institutes, etc.: 1957 correspondence and related materials re Memorial Day workshop
          Date: 1957
        • Box 3, Folder 42, Institutes, etc.: 1958 general correspondence
          Date: 1958
        • Box 3, Folder 43, Institutes, etc.: 1958 inquiries re workshops and training programs
          Date: 1958
        • Box 3, Folder 44, Institutes, etc.: 1959 general correspondence
          Date: 1959
        • Box 3, Folder 45, Institutes, etc.: Feb-May 1959 correspondence re workshops and training programs
          Date: Feb-May 1959
        • Box 3, Folder 46, Institutes, etc.: Jun-Dec 1959 correspondence re workshops and training programs
          Date: Jun-Dec 1959
        • Box 3, Folder 47, Institutes, etc.: [1950s] business correspondence and financial records
          Date: [1950s]
        • Box 3, Folder 48, Institutes, etc.: 2 fds. of [1950s] printed materials re workshops and training programs (incls bulletins and announcements)
          Date: [1950s]
        • Box 3, Folder 49, Institutes, etc.: 2 fds. of [1950s] printed materials re workshops and training programs (incls bulletins and announcements)
          Date: [1950s]
        • Box 3, Folder 50, Institutes, etc.: 1950-1959 correspondence with Kenneth T. Doran and others of New York State Education Department re incorporation of Moreno Institute
          Date: 1950-1959
        • Box 3, Folder 51, Institutes, etc.: 1960 general correspondence
          Date: 1960
        • Box 3, Folder 52, Institutes, etc.: Jan-May 1960 requests for information or literature re group psychotherapy, psychodrama, sociometry
          Date: Jan-May 1960
        • Box 3, Folder 53, Institutes, etc.: Jun-Dec 1960 requests for information or literature re group psychotherapy, psychodrama, sociometry
          Date: Jun-Dec 1960
        • Box 3, Folder 54, Institutes, etc.: Jan-Jun 1960 correspondence re workshops and training programs
          Date: Jan-Jun 1960
        • Box 3, Folder 55, Institutes, etc.: Jul-Dec 1960 correspondence re workshops and training programs
          Date: Jul-Dec 1960
        • Box 4, Folder 56, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: Dec 1960-Jan 1961 correspondence with various people
          Date: Dec 1960-Jan 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 57, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: Feb 1961 correspondence with various people
          Date: Feb 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 58, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: Mar 1961 correspondence with various people
          Date: Mar 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 59, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: Apr-Jul 1961 correspondence with various people
          Date: Apr-Jul 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 60, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: Sep-Dec 1961 correspondence with various people
          Date: Sep-Dec 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 61, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: 1961 form letters and lists of contributors
          Date: 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 62, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Founders Fund, as follows: 1961 financial and business data
          Date: 1961
        • Box 4, Folder 63, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1960-1961 correspondence and related materials re litigation against Eugene Spitz, Esmera Distributors
          Date: 1960-1961
        • Box 4, Folder 64, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1961-1962 general correspondence
          Date: 1961-1962
        • Box 4, Folder 65, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1963 general correspondence
          Date: 1963
        • Box 4, Folder 66, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1964 general correspondence
          Date: 1964
        • Box 4, Folder 67, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1964 Walt Klavun correspondence re foundation support for Moreno Institute
          Date: 1964
        • Box 4, Folder 68, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1965 general correspondence
          Date: 1965
        • Box 4, Folder 69, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1965 plans and outlines for Directors of Workshops
          Date: 1965
        • Box 4, Folder 70, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1966 general correspondence
          Date: 1966
        • Box 4, Folder 71, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1967 general correspondence
          Date: 1967
        • Box 4, Folder 72, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1967 correspondence re training programs
          Date: 1967
        • Box 4, Folder 73, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1967 correspondence and related materials re advertisement in New York Review of Books
          Date: 1967
        • Box 4, Folder 74, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1967-1968 correspondence with Leon Greenberg, coordinator of Senior Seminar program
          Date: 1967-1968
        • Box 5, Folder 75, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1968 general correspondence
          Date: 1968
        • Box 5, Folder 76, Moreno Institute, etc.: Jan-Aug 1968 inquiries re training programs
          Date: Jan-Aug 1968
        • Box 5, Folder 77, Moreno Institute, etc.: Sep-Dec 1968 inquiries re training programs
          Date: Sep-Dec 1968
        • Box 5, Folder 78, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1969 general correspondence
          Date: 1969
        • Box 5, Folder 79, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1969 correspondence and related materials re Magic Charter of Psychodrama
          Date: 1969
        • Box 5, Folder 80, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1969 press releases and program announcements
          Date: 1969
        • Box 5, Folder 81, Moreno Institute, etc.: [1960s] miscellaneous or undated materials
          Date: [1960s]
        • Box 5, Folder 82, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1960s printed materials (includes brochures, programs, certificates)
          Date: 1960s
        • Box 5, Folder 83, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1960s printed and miscellaneous materials from other sources
          Date: 1960s
        • Box 5, Folder 84, Moreno Institute, etc.: slight 1969-1970 correspondence and financial records re training sessions given by Priscilla Ransohoff and Charles Brin
          Date: 1969-1970
        • Box 5, Folder 85, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1969-1970 correspondence and related materials re sessions for West Philadelphia Community Mental Health Consortium
          Date: 1969-1970
        • Box 5, Folder 86, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1970 general correspondence
          Date: 1970
        • Box 5, Folder 87, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1971 general correspondence
          Date: 1971
        • Box 5, Folder 88, Moreno Institute, etc.: correspondence and related materials re Jul 1-3, 1972 Directors' Workshop
          Date: Jul 1-3, 1972
        • Box 6, Folder 89, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1972-1973 general correspondence
          Date: 1972-1973
        • Box 6, Folder 90, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1973 correspondence re literature and information
          Date: 1973
        • Box 6, Folder 91, Moreno Institute, etc.: Jan-Apr 1973 inquiries re training programs
          Date: Jan-Apr 1973
        • Box 6, Folder 92, Moreno Institute, etc.: May-Dec 1973 inquiries re training programs
          Date: May-Dec 1973
        • Box 6, Folder 93, Moreno Institute, etc.: Jan-Jun 1974 general correspondence
          Date: Jan-Jun 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 94, Moreno Institute, etc.: Jul-Dec 1974 general correspondence
          Date: Jul-Dec 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 95, Moreno Institute, etc.: 1974 correspondence re literature, information, training programs
          Date: 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 96, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: 2 fds. Of Sep. 1974 correspondence re Board of Trustees
          Date: Sep. 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 97, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: 2 fds. Of Sep. 1974 correspondence re Board of Trustees
          Date: Sep. 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 98, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: Oct-Nov 1974 correspondence re Board of Trustees
          Date: Oct-Nov 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 99, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: Sep 1974 correspondence re faculty and counselors
          Date: Sep 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 100, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: Sep-Oct 1974 correspondence re faculty and counselors
          Date: Sep-Oct 1974
        • Box 6, Folder 101, Moreno Institute, etc.: Correspondence and related materials re reorganization on Institute after JLM's death, as follows: 1974 miscellaneous resumes
          Date: 1974
      • 2. Business and Financial Records, 1960-1977.
        Date: 1960-1977.
        • Box 7, Folder 102, 1975-1977 general correspondence
          Date: 1975-1977
        • Box 7, Folder 103, 1970s printed matter (incls directory, programs, brochure)
          Date: 1970s
        • Box 7, Folder 104, 1970s printed matter from outside sources
          Date: 1970s
        • Box 7, Folder 105, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 1960-1965 correspondence with Francis X. Stephens and Saul Fleischman and related materials re purchase of premises in New York City
          Date: 1960-1965
        • Box 7, Folder 106, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 1961-1965 correspondence and related materials re Hudson Hills property
          Date: 1961-1965
        • Box 7, Folder 107, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 1964-1973 correspondence and related materials with Howard Fuel Corporation
          Date: 1964-1973
        • Box 7, Folder 108, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 2 fds. of mostly 1960s financial records from Howard Fuel Corporation
          Date: 1960s
        • Box 7, Folder 109, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 2 fds. of mostly 1960s financial records from Howard Fuel Corporation
          Date: 1960s
        • Box 7, Folder 100, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 2 fds. of mostly 1970s financial records from Howard Fuel Corporation
          Date: 1970s
        • Box 7, Folder 111, Materials, relating to business and financial matters, as follows: 2 fds. of mostly 1970s financial records from Howard Fuel Corporation
          Date:
Jacob L. Moreno
BornIacob Levy
May 18, 1889
Bucharest, Romania
DiedMay 14, 1974(1974-05-14) (aged 84)
Beacon, New York, U.S.
ResidenceNew York, U.S.
Alma materUniversity of Vienna
Known forSociometry, psychodrama
Spouse(s)Zerka T. Moreno
Scientific career
FieldsTheory, education, psychiatry, psychology, psychotherapy, social psychology
InfluencedKurt Lewin, Martin Buber, Fritz Perls

Jacob Levy Moreno (born Iacob Levy; May 18, 1889 – May 14, 1974) was a Romanian-American psychiatrist, psychosociologist, and educator, the founder of psychodrama, and the foremost pioneer of group psychotherapy. During his lifetime, he was recognized as one of the leading social scientists.

Early life and education[edit]

Jacob Levy Moreno was born in Bucharest in the Kingdom of Romania. His father was Moreno Nissim Levy, a SephardiJewish merchant born in 1856 in Plevna in the Ottoman Empire (today Pleven, Bulgaria). Jacob's grandfather Buchis had moved to Plevna from Constantinople, where his ancestors had settled after they left Spain in 1492. It is thought that the Morenos left Plevna for Bucharest during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–1878, following the Plevna rabbi, Haim Bejarano in search of a more hospitable environment. Jacob Moreno's mother, Paulina Iancu or Wolf, was also a Sephardi Jew, born in 1873, and originated from Călăraşi, Romania.[1]

In 1895, a time of great intellectual creativity and political turmoil, the family moved to Vienna. He studied medicine, mathematics, and philosophy at the University of Vienna, becoming a Doctor of Medicine in 1917. He had rejected Freudian theory while still a medical student, and became interested in the potential of group settings for therapeutic practice.[2]

In his autobiography, Moreno recalls this encounter with Sigmund Freud in 1912. "I attended one of Freud’s lectures. He had just finished an analysis of a telepathic dream. As the students filed out, he singled me out from the crowd and asked me what I was doing. I responded, 'Well, Dr. Freud, I start where you leave off. You meet people in the artificial setting of your office. I meet them on the street and in their homes, in their natural surroundings. You analyze their dreams. I give them the courage to dream again. You analyze and tear them apart. I let them act out their conflicting roles and help them to put the parts back together again.'"[3]

Marriages and children[edit]

In Brooklyn, New York, Moreno married Beatrice Beecher in 1926. The marriage ended in divorce, and in 1938 he married Florence Bridge, with whom he had one child, Regina (born 1939). They too were divorced, and he married Zerka Toeman in 1949, with whom he had one child Jonathan D. Moreno (born 1952).[4]

Career[edit]

While living in Vienna in the early 1900s Moreno started an improvisational theater company, Stegreiftheater, the Theater of Spontaneity [5]:72 where he formulated a form of psychotherapy he called psychodrama, which employed improvised dramatizations, role-plays and other therapeutic, spontaneous dramatic expressions that utilized and unleashed the spontaneity and creativity of the group and its individual members.[5]:15,16 Moreno saw "psychodrama as the next logical step beyond psychoanalysis." It was "an opportunity to get into action instead of just talking, to take the role of the important people in our lives to understand them better, to confront them imaginatively in the safety of the therapeutic theater, and most of all to become more creative and spotantaneous human beings."[5]:50

In his book Who Shall Survive? (Preludes, p.xxviii) Moreno wrote of the genesis of his Group Psychotherapy in 1913-14 in Vienna, formulating his ideas while working with groups of prostitutes.

Moving to the U.S. in 1925, he began working in New York City. In this country, Moreno worked on his theory of interpersonal relations, and the development of his work in psychodrama, sociometry, group psychotherapy, sociodrama, and sociatry. In his autobiography he wrote "only in New York, the melting pot of the nations, the vast metropolis, with all its freedom from all preconceived notions, could I be free to pursue sociometric group research in the grand style I had envisioned".[6]

He later held positions at Columbia University[7] and the New School for Social Research.[8]

In 1932, Moreno first introduced group psychotherapy to the American Psychiatric Association, and co-authored the monograph Group Method and Group Pschotherapy along with Helen Hall Jennings.[9] For the next 40 years he developed and introduced his Theory of Interpersonal Relations and tools for social sciences he called 'sociodrama', 'psychodrama', 'sociometry', and 'sociatry'. In his monograph entitled, "The Future of Man's World", he describes how he developed these sciences to counteract "the economic materialism of Marx, the psychological materialism of Freud, and the technological materialism" of our modern industrial age.[10]

His autobiography describes his position as "threefold:

  1. Spontaneity and creativity are the propelling forces in human progress, beyond and independent of libido and socioeconomic motives [that] are frequently interwoven with spontaneity-creativity, but [this proposition] does deny that spontaneity and creativity are merely a function and derivative of libido or socioeconomic motives.
  2. Love and mutual sharing are powerful, indispensable working principles in group life. Therefore, it is imperative that we have faith in our fellow man’s intentions, a faith which transcends mere obedience arising from physical or legalistic coercion.
  3. That a super dynamic community based on these principles can be brought to realization through new techniques..."[3]

Moreno died in New York City in 1974, aged 84.[2] He chose to die by abstaining from all food and water after a long illness. His epitaph, at his request, reads "the man who brought laughter to psychiatry."[11]

Summary of contribution[edit]

There is evidence that the methods of J. L. Moreno have held up respectably over time.[12] Subsequent research from the University of Vienna shows the enormous influence that Moreno's theory of the Encounter (Invitations to an Encounter, 1914) had on the development of Martin Buber's I-Thou philosophy, and Buber's influence on philosophy, theology, and psychology.[13] His wife, Zerka Moreno, wrote: "While it is true that Buber broadened the idea of the Encounter, he did not create the instruments for it to occur." Moreno "produced the various instruments we now use for facilitating the human encounter, sociometry, group psychotherapy, psychodrama, and sociodrama".[14] Zerka was herself an expert in psychodrama and sociometry, and continued her late husband's work.[15]

With training centers and institutes on nearly every continent, there are many thousands of students who are expanding and developing training and teaching the Morenean Arts and Sciences across the disciplines, to more fully realize Moreno's vision to make these social sciences available for "the whole of [hu]mankind."[16]

Moreno is also widely credited as one of the founders of the discipline of social network analysis, the branch of sociology that deals with the quantitative evaluation of an individual's role in a group or community by analysis of the network of connections between them and others.[5]:21,22

His 1934 book Who Shall Survive? contains some of the earliest graphical depictions of social networks (sociograms). In this book, he introduced a famous explanation, why a pandemic of runaways emerged at the New York Training School for Girls in Hudson.

  • Sociograms

Selected works by J. L. Moreno[edit]

  • Moreno, J. L. (1932). First Book on Group Therapy. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1934). Who Shall Survive? A new Approach to the Problem of Human Interrelations. Beacon House. ISBN 978-9992695722
  • Moreno, J. L. (1941). The Words of the Father. Beacon House. ISBN 978-1446601853
  • Moreno, J. L. (1946). Psychodrama Volume 1. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1947). The Theatre of Spontaneity Beacon House. ISBN 978-1445777139
  • Moreno, J. L. (1951). Sociometry, Experimental Method and the Science of Society: An Approach to a New Political Orientation. Beacon House. ISBN 978-1291121759
  • Moreno, J. L. (1953). Who Shall Survive? Foundations of Sociometry, Group Psychotherapy and Sociodrama. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1956). Sociometry and the Science of Man. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1959). Psychodrama Volume 2: Foundations of Psychodrama. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1960). The Sociometry Reader. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L., Moreno, Z. T., Moreno, J. D. (1964). The First Psychodramatic Family. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1966). The International Handbook of Group Psychotherapy. Philosophical Library.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1969). Psychodrama Volume 3: Action Therapy and Principles of Practice. Beacon House.
  • Moreno, J. L. (1989). Preludes of my Autobiography. Beacon House.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Marineau, René. (1992) Jacob Levy Moreno 1889-1974: father of psychodrama, sociometry and group psychotherapy. Create Space Independent Publishing Platform.
  • Moreno, Jonathan D. (2014) Impromptu Man: J.L. Moreno and the Origins of Psychodrama, Encounter Culture, and the Social Network. Bellevue Literary Press.
  • Nolte, John. (2014) The Philosophy, Theory and Methods of J. L. Moreno: The Man Who Tried to Become God (Explorations in Mental Health). Routledge.

External links[edit]

Moreno's ancestral home in Pleven, Bulgaria, and a close-up view of the commemorative plaque
  1. ^Marineau, René F. (1989). "Ancestors and family: the birth of a myth". Jacob Levy Moreno, 1889-1974: father of psychodrama, sociometry, and group psychotherapy. Routledge. pp. 4–6. ISBN 978-0-415-04383-0. 
  2. ^ abBiographical detail[permanent dead link]: article by Lucy Ozarin, Psychiatric News (Volume 38, Number 10), May 16, 2003. Retrieved on December 29, 2007.
  3. ^ abThe Autobiography of J. L. Moreno, M.D. (Abridged), J. L. Moreno, Moreno Archives, Harvard University, 1985.
  4. ^Jacob Moreno from American National Biography
  5. ^ abcdMoreno, Jonathan D. (2014). Impromptu Man (1st ed.). NYU School of Medicine, NY: Bellevue Literary Press. ISBN 978-1-934137-84-0. 
  6. ^Journal of Group Psychotherapy, Psychodrama & Sociometry (Vol. 42, No. 1), J. L. Moreno, spring 1989.
  7. ^Taught at Columbia UniversityArchived 2009-01-06 at the Wayback Machine., evidenced in recollection: article by Mary Nicholas & Gene Eliasoph, The Group Circle (August/September 2002), American Group Psychotherapy Association. Retrieved on December 30, 2007.
  8. ^New School for Social ResearchArchived 2007-07-08 at the Wayback Machine.: short biography at SibiuOnline website. Retrieved on December 30, 2007.
  9. ^https://books.google.com.au/books?id=-qkaAAAAIAAJ&q=inauthor:%22Jacob+Levy+Moreno%22&dq=inauthor:%22Jacob+Levy+Moreno%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwievfiG163UAhULfrwKHVmrD9g4ChDoAQgwMAU
  10. ^The Future of Man's World, J. L. Moreno, New York Beacon House, Psychodrama Monographs, 1947.
  11. ^Johnson, David Read; Emunah, Renée, eds. (2009). Current Approaches in Drama Therapy (2nd ed.). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. p. 394. ISBN 978-0-398-07848-5. 
  12. ^Psychotherapy Networker, Clinician's Digest, January/February 2007.
  13. ^J.L. MORENO’S INFLUENCE ON MARTIN BUBER’S DIALOGICAL PHILOSOPHY. Robert Waldl. http://www.blatner.com/adam/pdntbk/BuberMoreno.html
  14. ^Psychodrama Network News, Zerka Moreno, winter 2007.
  15. ^"Zerka Moreno". Psychotherapy.net. September 2004. 
  16. ^Morenean Arts & Sciences: Moreno Institute East website. Retrieved on December 29, 2007.

One thought on “Jl Moreno Bibliography Sample

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *